Thursday, 9 November 2017

New planning laws should not just benefit multinationals, says IPAV

The Government’s plan to allow companies building data centres to bypass the local authority stage and apply directly to An Bord Pleanála is aiding major multinationals while leaving national developers at the mercy of the State’s “problematic” planning laws, a representative body for auctioneers has said. The Institute of Professional Auctioneers & Valuers (IPAV) is calling on the Government to amend planning laws so that objections to construction plans cannot be made by any person but only by those directly affected by the proposed project.

Read the full story @ The Irish Times

College Green plaza decision delayed to next April

A decision on whether a new €10 million civic plaza can be built in College Green will not be made until next April at the earliest, several months after Dublin City Council planned to start work on the scheme. The delay means the council will not be able to stop buses crossing College Green ahead of the start of operations of the new Cross City Luas line in December.

Read the story @ The Irish Times

‘Strategic infrastructure’ quick-step would not have saved Apple’s project


The Government’s response to the disaster that is the Apple/Athenry saga is to propose that, in future, data centres will be considered “strategic infrastructure” under planning laws. This will allow companies building data centres to skip the local authority stage, and proceed straight to An Bord Pleanála. Even if such a regime had been in place when Apple first sought planning, it would have made very little difference. It wasn’t a delay by Galway County Council that gave Apple the hump and jeopardised the project.

Read the full story @ The Irish Times


Permission granted for new bridge across Shannon in Athlone

A new bridge across the Shannon in Athlone is to be built after An Bord Pleanála granted planning permission. The planning board on Tuesday gave approval for the construction of the 104-metre pedestrian and cycleway bridge across the river between the Radisson Blu Hotel and the Luan Gallery in the town. The bridge will form part of the planned Dublin-Galway greenway and will take two years to construct.

Read the full story @ The Irish Times

Cork County Council accused of arrogance by residents opposed to motorway plans




The Government’s response to the disaster that is the Apple/Athenry saga is to propose that, in future, data centres will be considered “strategic infrastructure” under planning laws. This will allow companies building data centres to skip the local authority stage, and proceed straight to An Bord Pleanála. Even if such a regime had been in place when Apple first sought planning, it would have made very little difference. It wasn’t a delay by Galway County Council that gave Apple the hump and jeopardised the project.


Read the full story@ The Irish Times

Cork County Council has been accused of arrogance in its determination to push ahead with a €220 million upgrade of the N28 Cork to Ringaskiddy road rather than seriously look at alternative routes that would have less of an impact on residents, an oral hearing into the project has heard.
Domhnall MacDomhnaill of the Rochestown Rise Residents’ Association on Tuesday told the An Bord Pleanála oral hearing into the project that Cork County Council, as the applicant for planning permission, was ignoring its duty of care to residents in Rochestown, Douglas and surrounding areas.
Cork County Council has been accused of arrogance in its determination to push ahead with a €220 million upgrade of the N28 Cork to Ringaskiddy road rather than seriously look at alternative routes that would have less of an impact on residents, an oral hearing into the project has heard.
Domhnall MacDomhnaill of the Rochestown Rise Residents’ Association on Tuesday told the An Bord Pleanála oral hearing into the project that Cork County Council, as the applicant for planning permission, was ignoring its duty of care to residents in Rochestown, Douglas and surrounding areas.
Cork County Council has been accused of arrogance in its determination to push ahead with a €220 million upgrade of the N28 Cork to Ringaskiddy road rather than seriously look at alternative routes that would have less of an impact on residents, an oral hearing into the project has heard.
Domhnall MacDomhnaill of the Rochestown Rise Residents’ Association on Tuesday told the An Bord Pleanála oral hearing into the project that Cork County Council, as the applicant for planning permission, was ignoring its duty of care to residents in Rochestown, Douglas and surrounding areas.
Cork County Council has been accused of arrogance in its determination to push ahead with a €220 million upgrade of the N28 Cork to Ringaskiddy road rather than seriously look at alternative routes that would have less of an impact on residents, an oral hearing into the project has heard.
Domhnall MacDomhnaill of the Rochestown Rise Residents’ Association on Tuesday told the An Bord Pleanála oral hearing into the project that Cork County Council, as the applicant for planning permission, was ignoring its duty of care to residents in Rochestown, Douglas and surrounding areas.

Wednesday, 17 May 2017

Dublin Port film studio plans have been rejected

Dublin Port Company (DPC) has poured cold water over plans to bring a new film studio to south Dublin.
DPC has published a report on the public consultation process for the first review of its Masterplan 2012-2040 which reached out to local residents, political representatives, local businesses, community and environmental groups.
It found that there is no room for a studio in its future plans:
"There was one submission supporting the location of a film studio in the Port Estate. This submission was lodged by the project promoters," the review of the consultation process stated.
"No submissions were advanced which advocated the transfer or surrender of port lands for non-port purposes. Specifically there were no third party submissions advocating the development of a film studio on port lands in the Poolbeg Peninsula. The submission lodged by the promoters of the film studio proposal provided no detail or information on how their proposed project could be reconciled within the context of the issues identified within the Masterplan Review Paper," the report added.
This space will be used for, "core port purposes as an alternative to additional infill proposals."
In January, Dublin City Council (DCC) revealed plans to build a new mini-town in this area. Its 'Poolbeg West' development south of the Docklands beside Ringsend, will have space for 3,000 new homes.
When those plans were announced in January, Dublin Bay Studios reiterated its hopes to build a production facility.
It said that the studio would create 1,800 direct jobs and a further 1,800 indirectly. There is still a possibility that alternative plans could bring a production facility to the area.
In a joint statement today the duo behind the proposals, Windmill Lane Studios founder James Morris and producer Alan Moloney, told Newstalk:
"The Studios continue to receive overwhelming support and we are very committed to delivering on this project because we believe it is in the national interest. Not only will it support the regeneration of Dublin’s inner city, it will also act as a catalyst for growth in the creative industries, creating thousands of jobs and putting Ireland on the map internationally for film, TV and digital content production."
The proposed development would be situated on part of the Poolbeg West SDZ area which has been classified as not suitable for housing.
A spokesperson from Dublin Bay Studios added: "It is our understanding that there were in excess of 40 public submissions in support of the development ... In his report on the Poolbeg West SDZ public consultation process, the Chief Executive of Dublin City Council noted that there was a ‘significant’ number of public submissions in support of the Studios."

View the full article @ Newstalk

Dublin's Iveagh Markets at risk if €100m project does not go ahead

Heritage body An Taisce is seeking urgent action from Dublin City Council to halt the dereliction of the historic Iveagh Markets, which were to have restored as part of a €100 million redevelopment scheme. Temple Bar hotelier and publican Martin Keane had been due to start work two years ago on an ambitious project to redevelop the late Victorian market on Francis Street in the Liberties, along with the former music venue Mother Redcaps, as a hotel, restaurant and food market complex.

Read the full article @ The Irish Times